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Today in Real Reform & Innovation, 1/18/12

1/18/12: What’s the word from #RealReform Twitterbirds? Three biggies: 1) ‘love’ (for Gov. Jerry Brown, again), 2) ‘Data’ (the opposite of love, if tweets about #dayofdata are any indication) & 3) ‘organize’ (to support AZ teachers, students & curricular freedom). Full recap after the jump. Read More

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Today in Real Reform & Innovation, 1/17/12

1/17/12: What has real reformers buzzing? Continuing battles over curriculum (Srsly, Arizona?), California’s Governor, the importance of play & more, after the jump. Read More

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Today in Real Reform & Innovation, 1/12/12

1/12/12: What #realreform news lit the Twitterverse? A research review about which incentives move teachers, heart-breaking dysfunction in a PA school district (& the “redlining”/Scantron-ifying of schools nationwide), & thoughts on good teaching practice from the Academy. Full text & Tweet-y goodness after the jump. Read More

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Today in Real Reform & Innovation, 1/9/12

Over at Storify, I’ve just started highlighting the tweets and shares of people who are talking about school improvement and innovation from a non-corporate perspective. Today, they’re talking about student motivation, scandalous would-be charter school operators (and the federal agencies giving them our tax dollars!), and more. Check it out! Read More

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Why I’m Marching

Published at The Huffington Post on May 23, 2011

“The development of common standards and shared assessments radically alters the market for innovation in curriculum development, professional development, and formative assessments. Previously, these markets operated on a state-by-state basis, and often on a district-by-district basis. But the adoption of common standards and shared assessments means that education entrepreneurs will enjoy national markets where the best products can be taken to scale.”
Joanne Weiss, chief of staff to Education Secretary Duncan and former CEO of the New Schools Venture Fund

When I talk to teachers, students and parents, and when I think about education policy and politics, two simple questions almost always come to the fore.

  • If America needs to reform its public schools, why aren’t public school teachers, students and families leading the education reform movement?
  • If teachers, students and public school families are most familiar with the problems with our current school system, why aren’t our voices being heard when we question education policy, or suggest better alternatives?

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